Too many legends are dying this week.  Lauren Bacall had that special onscreen magic that made you just need to watch her.  It’s probably part of what entranced Bogey when they first worked together.
Rest in Peace Ms. Bacall.

Too many legends are dying this week.  Lauren Bacall had that special onscreen magic that made you just need to watch her.  It’s probably part of what entranced Bogey when they first worked together.

Rest in Peace Ms. Bacall.

folkinz:

A memorial for Robin Williams at the “Good Will Hunting” bench in the Boston Public Garden. (via)

folkinz:

A memorial for Robin Williams at the “Good Will Hunting” bench in the Boston Public Garden. (via)

(via entertainmentweekly)

theacademy:

via reddit

RIP Harold Ramis.

theacademy:

via reddit

RIP Harold Ramis.

drunkonfairyblood:

He does still surprise me and he makes me hungry to work with him and see what he does and comes up with. [The Master] was something that I came up with because I wanted to spend more time with him. We’d worked together a lot, five times. But it was never enough. It was a supporting part or something like that. It never felt like we’d gotten super dirty enough together" - Paul Thomas Anderson

RIP

(via phenomenaaa)

latimes:

latimespast:

Cal Worthington and his “dog Spot” in 1974. The Southern California legend of car sales died Sunday at 92.

When Worthington prepared to make his TV debut, he conceived an ad that teased his rivals while also poking fun at himself. But instead of man’s best friend, he chose a gorilla, which appeared on camera acting very undog-like while chained to the bumper of a car.
"Speak, Spot," Worthington told the beast. The gorilla roared, the audience howled. And "business about tripled" after the commercials began airing, he said.
Worthington “was a marketing and advertising genius,” said marketing consultant and teacher Larry Londre, who grew up in Los Angeles appreciating the circus flair of the commercials. “He created what you would call a unique selling proposition. Instead of selling cars he sold a personality.”

The Times obituary by Martin Miller and Elaine Woo has many more colorful stories, a photo gallery and a video that includes clips of Worthington’s famous commercials.
— Matt Ballinger
(Photo: Cal Worthington in a TV studio on Jan. 29, 1974. Credit: Marianna Diamos / Los Angeles Times file)



I grew up watching Cal Worthington.  I swear I thought he would be immortal.

latimes:

latimespast:

Cal Worthington and his “dog Spot” in 1974. The Southern California legend of car sales died Sunday at 92.

When Worthington prepared to make his TV debut, he conceived an ad that teased his rivals while also poking fun at himself. But instead of man’s best friend, he chose a gorilla, which appeared on camera acting very undog-like while chained to the bumper of a car.

"Speak, Spot," Worthington told the beast. The gorilla roared, the audience howled. And "business about tripled" after the commercials began airing, he said.

Worthington “was a marketing and advertising genius,” said marketing consultant and teacher Larry Londre, who grew up in Los Angeles appreciating the circus flair of the commercials. “He created what you would call a unique selling proposition. Instead of selling cars he sold a personality.”

The Times obituary by Martin Miller and Elaine Woo has many more colorful stories, a photo gallery and a video that includes clips of Worthington’s famous commercials.

Matt Ballinger

(Photo: Cal Worthington in a TV studio on Jan. 29, 1974. Credit: Marianna Diamos / Los Angeles Times file)

I grew up watching Cal Worthington.  I swear I thought he would be immortal.

 Never open a book with weather.
 Avoid prologues.
 Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue.
 Never use an adverb to modify the verb “said” … 
 Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose. 
 Never use the words “suddenly” or “all hell broke loose.”
 Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly.
 Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.
 Don’t go into great detail describing places and things.
 Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.
Goodbye Mr. Leonard
  1.  Never open a book with weather.
  2.  Avoid prologues.
  3.  Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue.
  4.  Never use an adverb to modify the verb “said” … 
  5.  Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose. 
  6.  Never use the words “suddenly” or “all hell broke loose.”
  7.  Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly.
  8.  Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.
  9.  Don’t go into great detail describing places and things.
  10.  Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.

Goodbye Mr. Leonard

I just wanted to take a moment to share this.  Mr. Dennis Farina, one of my favorite actors, passed away this week.  Out of Sight is an incredible film absolutely filled with incredible performances - and my favorite performance from Mr. Farina.

RIP Ray Harryhausen, movie magic-maker.

RIP Ray Harryhausen, movie magic-maker.

sundancearchives:

“Roger Ebert was one of the great champions of freedom of artistic expression. When the power of independent film was still unknown and few would support it, Roger was there for our artists. His personal passion for cinema was boundless, and that is sure to be his legacy for generations to come.”  — Robert RedfordPhoto by Calvin Knight

sundancearchives:

“Roger Ebert was one of the great champions of freedom of artistic expression. When the power of independent film was still unknown and few would support it, Roger was there for our artists. His personal passion for cinema was boundless, and that is sure to be his legacy for generations to come.”  — Robert Redford

Photo by Calvin Knight

sci-fact:


The first human being to set foot on another world, Neil Armstrong; (August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012)

sci-fact:

The first human being to set foot on another world, Neil Armstrong; (August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012)

(via aworthyendeavor)