The theaters of the future will be bigger and more beautiful than ever before. They will employ expensive presentation formats that cannot be accessed or reproduced in the home (such as, ironically, film prints). And they will still enjoy exclusivity, as studios relearn the tremendous economic value of the staggered release of their products.
The projects that most obviously lend themselves to such distinctions are spectacles. But if history is any guide, all genres, all budgets will follow. Because the cinema of the future will depend not just on grander presentation, but on the emergence of filmmakers inventive enough to command the focused attention of a crowd for hours.
These new voices will emerge just as we despair that there is nothing left to be discovered. As in the early ’90s, when years of bad multiplexing had soured the public on movies, and a young director named Quentin Tarantino ripped through theaters with a profound sense of cinema’s past and an instinct for reclaiming cinema’s rightful place at the head of popular culture.
Never before has a system so willingly embraced the radical teardown of its own formal standards. But no standards means no rules. Whether photochemical or video-based, a film can now look or sound like anything.
It’s unthinkable that extraordinary new work won’t emerge from such an open structure. That’s the part I can’t wait for.

Christopher Nolan, “Films of the Future Will Still Draw People to Theaters”. (via fuckyeahdirectors)

I really needed to read this.

(via fuckyeahdirectors)

When I was a kid, there was no collaboration; it’s you with a camera bossing your friends around. But as an adult, filmmaking is all about appreciating the talents of the people you surround yourself with and knowing you could never have made any of these films by yourself. — Steven Spielberg
It’s incumbent upon a director to give his trust to every actor that he has cast from the very start, but the director isn’t owed that same immediate trust. He has to earn it, because the actor is far more vulnerable to the director than the director is to the actor. — Dwight Yoakam
The most honest form of filmmaking is to make a film for yourself. — Peter Jackson
boomerstarkiller67:

Steven Spielberg and Roy Scheider on the set of Jaws (1975)

boomerstarkiller67:

Steven Spielberg and Roy Scheider on the set of Jaws (1975)

Chef serves as a metaphor for the life of the passionate artist and working man.

What captures you when you first watch Chef is the sheer joy that Favreau had in making the film.

Steve West on Chef.
If you try to please audiences, uncritically accepting their tastes, it can only mean that you have no respect for them: that you simply want to collect their money. — Andrei Tarkovsky (via writingquotes)
totalfilm:

 Take a look at J.J. Abrams’ message to his Episode VII cast 
With cameras finally rolling on Star Wars: Episode VII, the steady stream of casting and plot-point rumours have gradually ground to a halt, but fortunately, we’re now at the stage where the first images are emerging from the production…

totalfilm:

Take a look at J.J. Abrams’ message to his Episode VII cast

With cameras finally rolling on Star Wars: Episode VII, the steady stream of casting and plot-point rumours have gradually ground to a halt, but fortunately, we’re now at the stage where the first images are emerging from the production…

…films have lost the automatic audience they had for so long. But having lost that steady audience, a marvelous historical irony is that they have come of age as a medium. Today they have complete freedom of expression, and perhaps this happened when the mass audience moved over to television. — Charles Champlin
1976
The whole idea of suspension of disbelief has evaporated. — Peter Bogdanovich