The Apartment (1960) Directed by Billy Wilder.

Ya know, I used to live like Robinson Crusoe; I mean, shipwrecked among 8 million people. And then one day I saw a footprint in the sand, and there you were.

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mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck in a still from Double Indemnity, 1944

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck in a still from Double Indemnity, 1944

(via phenomenaaa)

You don’t yell at a sleepwalker. He may fall and break his neck.

Joe Gillis • Sunset Blvd.

If you don’t find Wilder films to be impeccably written, you’re not paying enough attention. 

On the set of The Apartment (1960)

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Movies You Should See #28: Sunset Blvd. • director Billy Wilder

I might be a bit biased, but in an industry where most directors are lucky to have one, maybe two memorable films that define their career, Billy Wilder seems to have an endless amount.  And in a career of amazing films, Sunset Blvd. stands out from the pack.

Joe Gillis is dead.  He tells you so in the first frames of this film.  But what happens next is what makes his death, and his life matter.  From the beyond he begins to tell the audience how he died, and what led up to it - how a fledgling Hollywood screenwriter would up floating face down in the swimming pool of Norma Desmond, one of the silent screens greatest stars.  This is a tale of hubris, and it spares no expense.

Gloria Swanson stars in Sunset Blvd. as Norma Desmond and she is flawless.  Many actresses were afraid of this role, and turned Wilder down, because they were afraid of the cynical look the film took on Hollywood.  Ms. Swanson even received a nomination for Best Actress.

Sunset Blvd. is mesmerizing because of the incredible man that is Billy Wilder.  Wilder co-wrote and directed this film, and as always the film holds his classic wit, cynicism and power.  This film is not one that will leave you feeling uplifted, but it is one that teaches you something about humanity, and it has influenced filmmakers and artists since it first hit the screen decades ago.

Sunset Blvd. is one of the films that is constantly fighting for it’s place as my favorite film.  It normally holds a tie at the very top with another phenominal noir, The Usual Suspects.  If you watch this film you will not be able to withstand its power.  Sunset Blvd. is a film that grabs you and holds on; this film will stay with you long after the credits have rolled.

thefinalimage:

"Well, nobody’s perfect."

thefinalimage:

"Well, nobody’s perfect."

fuckyeahdirectors:

Jack Lemmon and Billy Wilder on the set of The Apartment (1960)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Jack Lemmon and Billy Wilder on the set of The Apartment (1960)

Movie You Should See #1: Ace in the Hole directed by Billy Wilder

I was first introduced to this film by one of my favorite professors - the same man that introduced me to Billy Wilder (and I cannot thank him enough for that).

Wilder made some pretty controversial films in his day, but this was one of the biggest.  It was released at two separate times, under two different titles.  The original title was this one - Ace in the Hole - the studio changed it to The Big Carnival right before its release without consulting Wilder and later changed it back.

This film did not sit well with audiences when it first came out, and may not sit will with some people now.  You see the subject matter of this film isn’t just relavent to 1951 - it’s relavent to now.  The main character Chuck Tatum, played by Kirk Douglas, is a reporter who cares more about his headline than anything else.  So when a man gets trapped in a mine in a small town, Tatum does what anyone can trust him to do - make it a headline.  The problem is that he does so at the expense of the trapped miner and his wife.

This film is populated with characters that are hard to like, but so realistic that they’re absolutely believable.  This film has the Wilder touch.  It was made over 60 years ago, but it’s just as relavent to the media today as when it was first made.

By Olly Moss.  I can’t tell you how much I love this.

By Olly Moss.  I can’t tell you how much I love this.